Surf Photo Friday featuring Mary Bagalso, Claire Bevilacqua, Crystal da Silva, Malia Fuertes, Prue Jeffries, Kyla Langen, Kim Mayer, Kassia Meador and Summer Romero on Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine.

Surf Photo Friday – The Session That Changed Everything

Surf Photo Friday featuring Mary Bagalso, Claire Bevilacqua, Crystal da Silva, Malia Fuertes, Prue Jeffries, Kyla Langen, Kim Mayer, Kassia Meador and Summer Romero on Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine.

Surf Photo Friday – The Session That Changed Everything

Truth be told these photos are from two days, July 21 and 22, 2005, yet in my memory they’ve become one and the same surf session. A month or so earlier I had picked up my first SLR camera since owning an old Canon AE-1 back in high school. A good friend of mine and great surfer in his own rite, Shane Sebastian, met me down at Oceanside Harbor for a quick photo shoot before the wind picked up.

Between his waves I noticed an entire crew of female surfers, some I recognized from the magazines, others unknown to me—riding the nose, hitting the lip, and basically dominating the lineup. My friend had long since gone home, but I stayed behind to document every turn I could of quite a diverse group of individuals—Mary Bagalso, Claire Bevilacqua, Crystal “CJ” da Silva, Malia Fuertes, Prue Jeffries, Kyla Langen, Kim Mayer, Kassia Meador, and Summer Romero.

In the days following this session, strangers became friends and we met up as often as possible to shoot photos, trade waves, and talk about the state of women’s surfing. Later that year both US-based surf magazines, Surf Life for Women and SG Magazine closed their doors at seemingly the same time which came as a horrible blow to the surf community. You can read about it more in depth here, but the magazine closures led directly to the creation of Jettygirl, the very site you’re visiting today.

When I’m old and gray and looking out over the lineup at Oceanside Harbor one day, I’ll always have great memories of this spot, these surfers, and the session that changed everything.

Thank you for dropping by for another installment of Surf Photo Friday. Have a great weekend everyone …and as always, thank you for your support of Jettygirl.

Mary Bagalso, Oceanside cutback, July 2005. Chris Grant photo on Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine.

Claire Bevilacqua, layback snap in Oceanside, July 2005. Chris Grant photo on Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine.

Crystal da Silva backside bank in Oceanside, July 2005. Chris Grant photo on Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine.

Malia Fuertes, Oceanside floater, July 2005. Chris Grant photo on Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine.

Prue Jeffries, Oceanside, July 2005. Chris Grant photo on Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine.

Kyla Langen off the lip in Oceanside, July 2005. Chris Grant photo on Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine.

Kim Mayer, frontside snap in Oceanside, July 2005. Chris Grant photo on Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine.

Kassia Meador drives off the bottom in Oceanside, July 2005. Chris Grant photo on Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine.

Summer Romero, Oceanside, July 2005. Chris Grant photo on Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine.

Previous Surf Photo Fridays | Justine Dupont and Pauline Ado in California | Role Models, Why They Still Matter | Surfing New Jersey’s Polar Vortex Swells with the K Twins | Mele Saili and Hayden Lane, Cardiff Reef | Jill Manos Surfs the Freezing Water of Nova Scotia, Canada | Malia Ward, Chris Ward, & a Surf Photographer’s Second Worst Nightmare | Chloe Buckley & the Tiny Five Hundred Dollar Wave | A Special Surf Session with Ashley Lloyd Thompson, Julie Cox, Alex Thompson, Chris Cuevas & Sheri Crummer | Kelly Nicely & the Pelican Session | Mary Osborne & Her Beloved 9’10″ Cooperfish Single Fin | Kelia Moniz, Megan Godinez, Geodee Clark & Bruna Schmitz | Kamalehua Keohokapu | Claire Bevilacqua | Lulu Erkeneff | Alexa Frantz |Rebecca Woods | Silvana Lima | Alessa Quizon

Additional Resources:
Claire Bevilacqua on Instagram
Crystal “CJ” da Silva on Instagram
Kyla Langen on Instagram
Kassia Meador on Instagram
Summer Romero on Instagram



Nixon The Time Teller Acetate Watch
Shop for your favorite brands in the Surf Store:

Nixon The Time Teller Acetate Watch – Classic slim watch from Nixon. Acetate band with stainless steel buckle. Custom 3-hand Japanese quartz movement for precision.

More in the Store >>



* Like, tweet, post, pin, comment or whatever. Waves are meant to be shared.

Surf Photo Friday featuring Pauline Ado and Justine Dupont on Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine.

Surf Photo Friday – Justine Dupont and Pauline Ado in California

Surf Photo Friday featuring Pauline Ado and Justine Dupont on Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine.

Justine Dupont, early morning surf session. Chris Grant photo on Jettygirl.
Surf Photo Friday – Justine Dupont and Pauline Ado in California

One of our favorite things about surfing is how the love of riding waves brings so many of us together regardless of country, culture or language. On the last morning that French surfers Justine Dupont and Pauline Ado spent in California, we made plans for a quick session before they jumped on the freeway to catch a flight from LAX later that afternoon. We were greeted by a bit of drizzle and zero sun, but we were also blessed with uncrowded, glassy rights.

It was such a pleasure to watch Pauline and Justine’s different approaches to the same lineup. A surf coach could write a “how-to” textbook after watching Pauline surf. Her combination of speed, power, flow, and clean rail work left no doubt why she continues to be an annual threat on the Women’s ASP World Tour. Justine Dupont took the the polar opposite approach. Where Pauline would go top to bottom as the wave lined up, Justine would routinely skip a section or two to build up crazy amounts of speed before launching a big air or fin-throw. Her surfing is electric and futuristic.

After an hour of shredding, the surfers headed up the trail and out of sight …until next summer when we hope to do it all again.

Thank you for dropping by for another installment of Surf Photo Friday. Have a great weekend everyone …and as always, thank you for your support of Jettygirl.

Justine Dupont fin throw. Chris Grant surf photo on Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine.

Pauline Ado, frontside carve. Chris Grant photo on Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine.

Justine Dupont, frontside air. Chris Grant photo on Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine.

Justine Dupont, frontside air. Chris Grant photo on Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine.

Pauline Ado throws spray on a nice frontside snap. Chris Grant photo on Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine.

Pauline Ado throwing spray. Chris Grant photo on Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine.

Justine Dupont frontside rotation. Chris Grant photo on Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine.

Justine Dupont above the lip. Chris Grant photo on Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine

Justine Dupont throws her fins. Surf photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine.

Pauline Ado, frontside snap. Chris Grant photo on Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine.

Frontside snap by Justine Dupont. Chris Grant photo on Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine.

Justine Dupont heading home. Chris Grant photo on Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine.

Pauline Ado and Justine Dupont leave the beach after their final surf session in California. Chris Grant photo on Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine.

Pauline Ado and Justine Dupont heading home to France. Chris Grant photo on Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine.

Pauline Ado and Justine Dupont heading home to France. Chris Grant photo on Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine.


Previous Surf Photo Fridays | Role Models, Why They Still Matter | Surfing New Jersey’s Polar Vortex Swells with the K Twins | Mele Saili and Hayden Lane, Cardiff Reef | Jill Manos Surfs the Freezing Water of Nova Scotia, Canada | Malia Ward, Chris Ward, & a Surf Photographer’s Second Worst Nightmare | Chloe Buckley & the Tiny Five Hundred Dollar Wave | A Special Surf Session with Ashley Lloyd Thompson, Julie Cox, Alex Thompson, Chris Cuevas & Sheri Crummer | Kelly Nicely & the Pelican Session | Mary Osborne & Her Beloved 9’10″ Cooperfish Single Fin | Kelia Moniz, Megan Godinez, Geodee Clark & Bruna Schmitz | Kamalehua Keohokapu | Claire Bevilacqua | Lulu Erkeneff | Alexa Frantz |Rebecca Woods | Silvana Lima | Alessa Quizon

Bonus Material: Pauline Ado and Justine Dupont Videos



Additional Resources:
Justine Dupont – official site
Justine Dupont on Instagram
Justine Dupont on Facebook
Justine Dupont on Twitter
Pauline Ado – official site
Pauline Ado on Instagram
Pauline Ado on Facebook
Pauline Ado on Twitter



Billabong First Point Bustier Surf Top
Shop for your favorite brands in the Surf Store:

Billabong First Point Bustier Surf Top – Bustier bikini top with adjustable spaghetti straps. Surf top is 90% neoprene/10% nylon.

More in the Store >>



* Like, tweet, post, pin, comment or whatever. Waves are meant to be shared.

Sarah Beardmore, Bec Woods, Kim Mayer, Chelsea Williams, Paige Hareb and Jenna Balester. Photographed by Chris Grant, Jettygirl.com

Throwback Thursday with Sarah Beardmore, Bec Woods, Kim Mayer, Chelsea Williams, Paige Hareb & Jenna Balester

Sarah Beardmore, Bec Woods, Kim Mayer, Chelsea Williams, Paige Hareb, Jenna Balester in Newport Beach

So blessed to answer the phone each summer and hear accents from around the world. This crew is awesome! I hope the girl groms in the background are taking notes. Pictured from left to right: Sarah Beardmore, Bec Woods, Kim Mayer, Chelsea Williams, Paige Hareb, and Jenna Balester.

* Read comments from the original Jettygirl Facebook post here >>

Additional Resources:
Throwback Thursday with Julie Cox and an Explosion of Light
Throwback Thursday with Alana Blanchard and a Baby Opossum
Throwback Thursday with Summer Romero: Few long boarders I’ve ever met…
Throwback Thursday with Alexa Frantz: Her eyes reflect…
Throwback Thursday with Dimity Stoyle: Dear Surf Industry…


Roxy K Meador 3/2mm BZ Fullsuit
Roxy K Meador 3/2mm BZ Fullsuit
3mm body with 2mm arms. Glue and blind stitched seams with short back zip.

More in The Store >>



* Like, tweet, post, pin, comment or whatever. Waves are meant to be shared.

Life Moves On... An Interview with Harley Rose Taich - Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine - Jettygirl Blog - Photo by Chris Grant

Life Moves On… An Interview with Harley Rose Taich

Life Moves On... An Interview with Harley Rose Taich - Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine - Jettygirl Blog - Photo by Chris Grant

  • sponsor-message
  • NVR Minimal Coverage Bikinis
  • Matuse Art + Function


What would you do if you were forced to stare at a blank wall for six months? No reading, no movies, nothing. Add in another year’s worth of daily nausea, dizziness, and migraines …how would you be feeling now? I can’t even imagine it, but that is exactly what happened to La Jolla’s Harley Taich when she suffered a brain injury midway through 2011.

The road to recovery has been a long journey and looks less like a straight line than a series of hills and valleys. I met Harley in late April of this year and although she was still experiencing a number of symptoms, she was smiling, surfing and enjoying life again. On a typical day we would meet up and film, head back to her beautiful hillside home for lunch with her dad, and then drive back to the beach for an afternoon session. During that stretch of time I saw secret spots, witnessed gnarly waves I’d avoid at all costs, and listened to stories of big barrels, pro surfing dreams and the heartbreak of life-changing injuries.

Harley was busy preparing for the Surfing America USA Championships as she had just received an injury wildcard entry into the event. Attempting to get back into the groove, she entered a few local surf contests as a warm-up and won both of them handily. Her nagging physical symptoms were still there, but she was charging and looking forward to returning to the national stage. Judging by the powerful and on-rail surfing that I witnessed, Harley was more than ready to compete for the title. Unfortunately, as often happens in tales of heroic comebacks, six days before the USA Championships Harley was surfing on a new board in dumpy, wedging peaks when her foot slipped off during a critical maneuver and her board slammed straight into her head. Lightning had indeed struck twice …Harley had received another concussion.

While her competitive surfing dreams have temporarily been placed on hold, I have no doubt that you will be hearing the name Harley Taich for years to come. Whether that comes by way of surfing or by generously helping other young athletes with head injuries is a story that’s yet to be written. For now though, read on because Harley has a lot to say… –Chris Grant

Jettygirl: You live in a beautiful part of San Diego. What makes La Jolla such a special place?
Harley Taich: I am very fortunate to have grown up in La Jolla, it is such a beautiful place. La Jolla is special because we have such a variety of surf breaks. We are also super close to Mexico and can go down there and score uncrowded waves. Some of La Jolla’s beaches remind me of Hawaii. We have a lot of white sand beaches and when the water is clear and the sun is out, it is absolutely beautiful.

Harley Taich at home in La Jolla. Surf photos by Chris Grant, Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine.I’ve only been down here a few times but it seems like a really tight-knit surf community where everyone knows everyone else? Did your parents grow up surfing the same spots you surf today?
La Jolla definitely is, especially the reefs. The Windansea and Big Rock crews are tight knit and there is definitely a hierarchy in the water. Everyone knows their place and when everyone is out it is hard to get good waves. I grew up surfing with just boys I looked up to (Skip, Jake, Fano, Lucas, Owen, Joey and Brady). There was not another girl surfer out of La Jolla beside myself so I had to work twice as hard but they all pushed me to take my level higher and I thank them for it. My dad was born in Northern California but moved down here when he was 16 years old, almost 35 years ago, and has lived here since. We both have grown up surfing the same breaks and it is cool because he has taught me all the lineup spots at our reefs and where to surf during storms and certain swells, winds, and tides. My dad’s passion has always been for big waves and he never wanted to miss the biggest waves of the year. Black’s is one of the few spots besides Little Makaha and The Cove that will hold the biggest rideable surf in Southern California. People come up to me all the time around here and tell me how they used to check on me when I was a year old as my dad would leave me on a big sand mound at Blacks and go out for hours. For sure all the time I spent at the beach waiting for him to get out of the water made me only want to get into it more…

Every time we’ve traveled to other areas of San Diego, I would get the sense that you were just itching to get back to your home breaks. Without giving away secret spots or locals-only waves, what makes La Jolla surf different than the surrounding areas?
Yeah, I love surfing other breaks up the coast but La Jolla always seems to be better and the water and atmosphere down here is just so much more beautiful in my opinion. We also have a lot of kelp beads so it keeps the wind down. We pick up North and South Swells and we have all these different nooks and crannies that on any given day produce world-class barrels by anyone’s standard, powerful and hollow.

Harley Taich duckdive in La Jolla. Photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine.
If someone gave you a free ticket to go surf any spot on the planet, where would it be and why? Similarly, if someone gave you a second free ticket to go to a place you’ve already traveled to before, where would that place be?
Wow, that’s a hard one. If someone gave me a free ticket to go surf any spot on the planet I would probably like to go to Micronesia, because I have never been there. I have always wanted to surf P-Pass. I have heard so many positive things and seen some sick footage and the waves there are the type of waves I thrive off of, hollow, fast, and powerful.

If I were given a second ticket to go anywhere it would have to be back to an outer island off of Tahiti. It is one of my favorite places I have traveled to and is so magical. I love everything about it including the perfect waves, crystal blue water, luscious green palm trees, and people that I have met there over the years …plus I’d get to surf with my friend Lanikai again.

Harley Taich throws a hook at Windansea. Surf photo courtesy of Jeff Taich.

Before your surfing accident, you were on a roll …winning contests, gaining sponsorships, and even making the US Team. Tell us a bit about the time period leading up to the contest at Pt. Magu.
Before my accident I was on a roll and I felt like I was on top of the world with my life. I was so hungry to improve my surfing and be the best I could be. I love surfing but ultimately I thrive off competition. Before my accident in August 2011, I had just made the USA team and I was so excited to go represent the USA in the ISA games in Panama and Nicaragua in hope of bringing home a gold medal. I had just returned home one day earlier from a month of surfing and training in Tahiti with a local girl Lanikai who was pushing my surfing to a whole new level. We were surfing everyday together for six hours a day catching hundreds of waves. Neither of us wanted to be the first one to paddle to the boat so we kept staying out until neither of us could even push up on another wave. Surfing with a girl who was not only my age but who I believe surfed better than most the girls on Tour was really good for my surfing and pushed me to a level I could never have imagined. I was so excited to bring what I had accomplished during the offseason back to competition that Fall. I really felt like I was going to be unstoppable.  It’s funny how life works out sometimes because I was there for a month and went over the dry razor sharp reef so many times with only a few minor scratches, and the day I get home to California, bam, I hit my head and was bedridden for 19 months.

Moments after Harley suffered a concussion.  Photo © Kelly SinkeldamIn the summer of 2011 your life changed in an instant. If it’s not too painful to discuss, can you describe what happened that day in Pt. Magu?
August 20th 2011, my life went from first class to cargo. I can only remember bits and pieces of the day that changed my life drastically. I remember how cold the water was and how fun the waves were. The sand at Point Mugu is very compact and hard unlike the sand at most beaches. I had made the final and was in a heat with three other girls. I remember taking off on a wave and then pulling into the barrel and ending it with a snap. What I don’t remember is what happened after that. I was told I went headfirst into the sand as the wave bottomed out. There was no water, just sand. I do remember coming in and coughing up so much sand that it was coming out of my lungs and nostrils, and it was quite painful. There was only five minutes left in the heat and I was winning by a wide margin and decided to go in before it was over because I didn’t feel well. I was walking up the beach and started feeling like I was going to pass out. A paramedic happened to see my eyes roll backward and helped carry me up the rocks and laid me down. It happened on a naval base so there were a lot of officers, paramedics, and lifeguards. I remember having fifty people hovering over me and I felt super claustrophobic. They wanted to take me to the emergency room after people had told them I hit my head. I was very combative and was screaming at them telling them I wanted to go up and get my trophy because I had just won the event. They told me I couldn’t which made me angry. I tried to stand up anyway but was so dizzy I had to lie back down. They ended up strapping me to a gurney in an ambulance and said they were going to handcuff me if I didn’t cooperate. I was told I kept repeating myself and was crying and screaming hysterically but I don’t remember that part. All I remember is that I didn’t feel normal and I didn’t know what was wrong. All I knew is I wanted to go home and be in the comfort of my own house. The impact I had when I projected headfirst into the sand was so hard that it tore the inside of my brain and left me with a Grade 3 concussion. Doctors have told me my case is one in a million and that people with brain bleeds or scull fractures recover faster than I have. In the last two years, I have been to eight brain surgeons (neurologists) and they all asked me the same question, “What part of my head hit first, the front, the back, or the side?” This important information could have helped diagnose which part of my brain was damaged. I felt so helpless because my father was not there to see it happen. My dad was in immediate contact with his good friends Chad Wells and Strider Wasilewski to see if they had seen the accident. Unfortunately, they didn’t have any information as they were out surfing themselves at the time.

How did you spend your days and months following the accident? You must have been dealing with heavy emotions as you realized how much your life had changed. What were some of the things you were thinking while you were laying there for months without reading, computers, or TV?
Life can change within the blink of an eye so it is important to never take anything for granted and to live everyday to the fullest. It might sound cliché, but until you’ve been through an ordeal you can’t comprehend how true that quote is. I have always been a happy kid since day one, so stoked on life and living. I never thought I would have feelings of killing myself on a daily basis. I even attempted it. At one point I felt so defeated and abandoned. Not being able to surf, walk, and be a teenager was so hard for me especially since I had always been so active. I went month after month with no TV, reading, computer, or Facebook. I missed my junior and part of senior year at school, as it all stimulates the brain and caused me to have nausea, vomiting, and intense migraines. I literally lay in bed in a dark room with no lights, staring at the four walls that surrounded me day after day sinking me into a deep depression. It felt like I was a prisoner in solitary confinement in my own bedroom. It was hard accepting the fact that I went from surfing six hours a day, running six miles, doing yoga every night to being able to do nothing but lie in bed and listen to music.  All I kept asking myself was, “Why me? Why did this have to happen to me …there are bad people out there, why not them!!?” It was really hard for me knowing my fellow competitors and friends were moving on with their lives and surfing while time stood still for me. Those months were some of the darkest months I will ever have to face, but I have grown up so much and it has only made me a stronger person. I was able to take something so negative and turn it into something positive. I stopped looking at myself as a victim and tried looking at my situation in a positive light even though it was hard. I realized I may be able to help other kids and teens with similar situations and possibly start a support group and organization for concussion research. People and doctors really do not understand brain injuries. It’s not like a “torn this” or “broken that,” it’s your brain and there is no magic pill or cure to fix a concussion. All you can do is rest, stay motionless and wonder when you can be normal again. Because people look at you and don’t see a cast or bandage, they think you are fine. All the while, they do not see the horrible symptoms or feel the pain your head, eyes, and body experience. The doctors say that it is especially hard for athletes to deal with the recovery associated with concussions because they are accustomed to being active. It’s really depressing when you are not used to being motionless and especially not knowing if or when you can ever return to activity again.

When you were finally able to get up and move around, what types of activities helped you regain your strength and stamina? At that time, did you ever doubt you’d surf again someday?
Harley Taich shredding at Blacks Beach. Surf photos by Chris Grant - Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine.When I got my migraines and nausea under control I started being able to do a little activity, but I had to avoid anything that would jar or shake my head, like running, jogging, and many other activities. Being how I loved being in the water and ocean, I started swimming laps at the local pool at La Jolla High School. This allowed me to be in the water but at this point I still never knew if I would be able to surf again. It wasn’t the ocean, but it was the second best thing. I started out only being able to do two laps and over the course of three months worked up to seventy laps which is a mile. I enjoyed swimming because it felt good on my body and it was a water-based activity which is where I feel most comfortable.  It was hard to do other activities like walking or yoga because when I’d get my heart rate up all my symptoms like migraines, nausea, dizziness, and fatigue would come on. Swimming seemed to be the only thing that I was able to do and monitor myself better.

As the weeks, months and almost years went by, I agonized over wondering if I would ever be able to surf again. Every time I tried I ended up slapping my head on the water only prolonging any type of full recovery. Doctors told me I would never be able to surf again because I couldn’t risk another head trauma and could have permanent brain damage for life. I realized that my condition was serious, but I wouldn’t let that control my life and I would prove them wrong. Surfing is my life and my dream and not being able to surf just isn’t an option for me. I will continue to keep fighting and make a comeback to just be able to surf again and ultimately compete again at a high level because surfing and its lifestyle is my life.

As with any accident, oftentimes there’s an outpouring of support in the immediate days following a life-altering event, but it doesn’t always remain for the long term. Who were some of the people that saw you through your most difficult times?
It was a very lonely time and some of the darkest of dark days in my life. My grandparents came down for a few weeks when I was at my worst and laid by my bedside and played board games with me. I wasn’t able to do much but it was nice to have the company. It’s funny because you realize who your real friends are when something bad happens to you and only a few friends come to visit or call. My dad was the one who was there for me the most and I am so lucky to have him as a father. He was definitely my rock and helped me get through everything.

Harley Taich photos by Chris Grant, Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine

You mentioned that you’d like to help other young people who have suffered brain injuries like yours to avoid some of the mistakes and pitfalls you experienced. Do you have any advice that you’d give someone who just suffered a similar brain injury?
About two months ago this 11 year old girl came into my work at South Coast Surf Shop and asked for me. She had heard about my accident through word of mouth. She told me that she was suffering from a concussion and had been experiencing some of the same symptoms as me for three months. She had tripped on a rug in her own house and fell backwards hitting her head on the hard wood floor. I was able to share information that I had gained from experience and the eight neurologists I had seen over the years. The information I was able to give her no doctor had ever even come close to helping her understand her condition. I was able to help her and give her advice on what she could do to help her get better and put her on a track of healing. She was just so happy to have someone to talk to that understood what she was going through and I was the first person who understood which was refreshing for her and me. When people see me they look at me and think I’m fine because on the outside I look completely normal but what they don’t know is I am broken on the inside. Same with this girl, kids will look at her and think she’s fine but they really don’t know what we are going through and the symptoms we battle everyday. Knowing I was able to help her brought a lot of joy to me and made me feel good.

After my experience it has made me want to help other kids and teens who are going through the same thing. I’d like to start some sort of support group to bring kids and teens with concussions together. I am starting to turn my experience from something that was so negative into something positive. Everyday that goes by I am so grateful to be alive and breathe in fresh air. Having the goal of surfing and competing was the only thing that got me through day to day.  I have been battling this for two years and have made so many mistakes that I wish I could go back in time and do it over. If anyone is battling from a concussion I would advise them to not go back to activity until their symptoms subside and to stay off all electronic devices because it is too stimulating for the brain and crucial for healing. Also, for those of you who are in school, for me reading brought on migraines so I didn’t go to school for a year. I had trouble with comprehension, spelling, and reading and still do to this day since my injury. I would tell a person to just take time off school and let her head heal. I’d also recommend that people stay hydrated, eat a lot of raw organic vegetables, juice, take magnesium, fish oil pills, iron if you’re a girl, and make sure to eat little healthy snacks all day.

Now that you’re easing your way back into the ocean, have you had to modify your approach to riding waves to protect against another head injury? I know you crave large surf but does the thought ever cross your mind that maybe you shouldn’t be out there on those days?
Everyday I surf I am risking my life and brain damage, but there is no better feeling than being in the ocean and gliding across the face of a wave. The doctors still don’t want me to surf but I am going to anyways. When I surf I am cautious and aware. I don’t take waves that I’m not going to make the drop on and I make sure that if I’m going for a turn, I’m going to complete it. I thrive off the feeling I get in big waves, and hollow suck-up barrels. I used to want to charge Mavericks. I was never pushed, it’s just something that feels good.  I love the feeling of my stomach turning inside-out and actually getting worked. I know right now it’s not an option for me, but maybe someday in the future I can charge big waves again. For now though, I need to be careful.

What other interests do you have besides surfing? Word on the street is that you’d like to publish a cookbook someday. Do you have a favorite recipe you’d like to share?
Harley's Famous Pumpkin Pie RecipeYes, I love cooking! For me cooking is a way to relax and challenge myself. I eat extremely healthy and am always coming up with new recipes that are good for my body and brain. (Click the photo for Harley’s Famous Pumpkin Pie recipe.) I make a grab cake that’s “to die for” according to my family. I love challenges and cooking is a way for me to push myself and see what I can create. I am working on a cookbook right now and hopefully will publish it within the next year. Besides cooking, I love watching movies and hanging with friends and my puppy. The things I love besides surfing are fitness-related, but right now I am unable to do a lot of those things. When I was able to, I enjoyed yoga, Pilates, running, and anything outdoors. I actually just wrote a children’s book on concussions that I hope to get published soon. If anyone knows any publishers or agents please let me know! (harleyrose95@gmail.com)

In the surf media these days, you’re more likely to see a top female surfer standing on the beach in a bikini than you are to see her surfing in one. Do you think women’s surfing is being portrayed accurately? If not, what changes would you like to see?
I think women’s surfing is being portrayed somewhat accurately. A lot of the media you read thinks it’s all being portrayed wrong. Having girls surfing in thongs has brought a lot of focus and attention to women’s surfing so in my opinion it really isn’t a bad thing.  All the women are absolutely killing it on tour and I love watching all the events. It makes me want to get back to competition soon and compete against everyone. As far as changes, I’d like to see more sponsorship of women based on their surfing ability.  I am not saying it is wrong for companies to reward for the whole package but it’s also sad to see really talented women who don’t have the “look” not getting endorsements at all.  In general, it seems like the surf industry is more hype driven for women. Ironically, the more money that moms and dads have to spend on hype for their kids, the more publicity and public attention just happens to come their way, regardless of their actual surfing ability. Then, the endorsements seem to follow. I’d like to see this change for sure, but it’s doubtful it will in the near future. Companies are making these people look really cool and are constantly seeking out what image they think the public wants to see in order to sell more of their label. I guess they call it branding.

Harley Taich's quote about women's surfing sponsorships. Surf photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl.com

A month or so ago we heard the exciting news that you had scored an injury wildcard entry to the US Championships at Lowers. How did it feel to be mixing it up in heats with the top American surfers again?
I was only surfing for a month and a half prior to the contest at Lower Trestles after being out of the water almost two years. It’s funny because the last time I really surfed I was only 15. I was super excited leading up to this contest, surfing as much as I could and as much as my head allowed me to do. It is such a fun wave and to get to surf it with only three other girls is exciting because it is always so crowded!!! Six days before the event I was out at Windansea trying out a brand new board. The waves were dredging, hollow and lumpy. When I went to do an off the lip my front foot slipped causing my back foot to push my board directly into my face. It smacked me directly in the front of my head leaving me with a big lump, feeling dizzy and causing a serious migraine. I had re-concussed again and this devastated me! Just the thought of starting all over again in bed was a nightmare that I wasn’t prepared to relive again so soon. All the thousands of off the lips I hit and now this freak accident was the last thing I saw coming. After that, I was in bed all the days leading to the event and had terrible migraines that no medication including 1000 mg Vicodin could even help. The doctors wanted me out of the water indefinitely. The risk they said far exceeded any reward I would get. I was back in a depression and lost many nights of sleep.

I don’t know why exactly, but this contest meant so much to me. I really wanted to put on a good show as it was my last year in the under 18′s and I wanted to see how I could do against all the best girls from Hawaii and USA. I woke up that morning feeling terrible with my head pounding. I was nauseous and also a little dizzy. A few hours before my heat I decided that I would just surf my heat and not care if I won or lost, just to enjoy myself and do it for me. I had a really bad migraine so I took some painkillers that made me a little loopy and some nausea pills to keep me from throwing up. I ended up doing well and advancing into the second round, which was held the next day. I was kind of shocked I made my heat because I felt so terrible but all the adrenaline is probably the only thing that kept me going. In the middle of the night I woke up with this pain in my toe and it kept me up all night. I thought I sleepwalked and broke it in the middle of the night because the pain was excruciating. I had my graduation early that morning and my heat wasn’t until 5 pm. I barely slept that night. My toe just kept throbbing throughout the day, I could barely walk on it but I decided to surf anyways. My head was spinning as I was so dizzy as an infection was contributing to my symptoms on top of my new concussion. I surfed my heat with only the quarter of my ability and surfed as well as I could possibly do given my circumstances.

Later that night after the second day of contest my foot doubled in size and I ended up having a serious staph infection that spread through my foot and leg and I was in the hospital for two days. Unfortunately I didn’t advance but I was happy anyways and so stoked to have surfed even though I was taking a chance in prolonging my recovery time if I was to fall and hit my head on the water. I took a big risk, which wasn’t the smartest thing, but I needed to surf for my sanity and healing process. My body filled up with many emotions and feelings, including anxiety, joy and thrill when I was paddling out in my heat. I wasn’t scared of losing but I was surfing with a lot of caution and hesitation. I didn’t want to hurt myself but I did want to advance. What most people don’t know or understand about serious concussions with brain tearing is that once you have one it’s easy to get another and the next one is usually worse than the first and so on.

Harley Taich sequence courtesy of Jeff Taich.

In today’s climate, many surfers shun competitive surfing, but you’ve told us that you absolutely love surf contests. What do you enjoy about the competitive surfing atmosphere?
It’s true, I thrive off competing. I love putting on a jersey and hearing that buzzer go off. I get butterflies and I love that feeling and excitement of winning and even losing. It’s weird to say I like losing, but when I lose it just makes me want to win even more the next time. When you win a contest it’s the best feeling in the world. I can’t even explain the rush I get.

After people saw you ripping in the contest, many were surprised to hear that you suffered another head injury in the days leading up to the event. What happened? Have you received a clean bill of health now or is your new injury a more serious setback?
Many were surprised to hear that I hadn’t been surfing for so long, but only a few people came up to me that day—the Hawaiians, Tatiana, Kaoli, Kiana, and Bailey. I always looked up to the Hawaiian girls I competed with and always looked forward to competing against Tatiana, Dax, Mahina and Bailey for their surfing ability but most of all because of the camaraderie they seem to have. It’s funny because I was enrolled at Sunset Elementary School across from Pipe in 2005 and would had been living there all these years but my dad got injured at Backdoor and ended up having spinal surgery so we moved back home to La Jolla. I guess I wished we had been able to stay.

It was also really nice to get a friendly greeting from Lulu and a few of the younger American girls, Samantha, Malia, Kylie, Meah, and Kloee who are all coming up through the rankings. It was exciting to see them surfing so well.

As far as a clean bill of health it’s just about what I have been doing, moving forward, staying positive, and taking it one day at a time. Reinjuring myself right before the event was a total fluke and was the last thing I was expecting. Consequently, it did not allow me to perform as well as I would have liked to. It’s just another bump in the road. I’ll push on and plan to keep succeeding.

With your goals having been squarely set on a pro career, how have the two years you’ve been out of the water affected your chances? With tour stops disappearing at an alarming rate over the past few years, it doesn’t seem like an easy path for rookie pros hitting the road for the first time. With so many talented surfers trying for a pro career, is it difficult to get into the events?
Yes, this is probably the most frustrating and giant setback of all because I’ve spent the last ten years of my life with the one goal of wanting to make it onto the World Tour. I was told that my ability was right there. Besides missing the last two years of being able to complete my amateur events and win NSSA and USA Championship titles, I also missed out as a USA Team member, which included two ISA World Jr. Games and the chance to compete and win a gold medal for the USA, the first one in Panama in 2012 and then again this year in Nicaragua.

Due to missing out the last two years, I have zero points. To the layman this might sound complicated but now, because of the lack of ASP Woman’s Qualifying Series events due to lack of sponsorship dollars and most of the 6 star events only having entry slots for 24 to 48 competitors, it is almost impossible to gain entry into the events. Over the past two years so many young girls jumped on the opportunity that had opened up to get into North America events and internationally and now they have good seed points for their future. Ultimately, I will be blocked unless the ASP gives me some wild cards into a 6 Star event and I advance, the ASP adds more entry slots like the men have, or a miracle happens and a whole bunch of girls randomly decide to drop out and quit. I don’t see that happening as women’s surfing is now more popular than ever. The only other opportunity is for me to chase 1- and 2-star events all over the globe and in a few years I might have enough points if everyone else stands still. I just hope to get a break and get a wild card that will afford me a running start to pursue my dreams.

To make a long story short, if you don’t see me surfing professionally in the future and wonder whatever happened to Harley Rose Taich, this time it won’t be due to injury.

Harley Taich, Blacks Beach - surf photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl.com

We’ve spent some time looking back. Let’s finish off looking forward. Describe a perfect day in your future.
A perfect day In my future would be me symptom free and not having to ever worry about bumping my head and re-concussing again, but that’s just something I will have to live with the rest of my life. I will have to alter my surfing. I see myself somewhere in the tropics, sipping a coconut and going out surfing a perfect wave pass with my dad and friends. I would also like to make the world tour and win an event, which would be my dream. I would love for my children’s book to get published because I believe it will help young kids understand concussions in a simple way. Whatever I do in my future, I just want to be successful and happy. Life is short and things can change in an instant. I just want to enjoy the ride when I’m on it.

Thank you for speaking with us Harley. Your story of pure grit and determination has inspired us greatly and we know it will do the same for many others as well. If you have any shout-outs or parting thoughts, feel free to share…
I would like to thank everyone who has supported me and helped me make it through these past two years. Thank you Chris Grant for taking so much of your time to shoot and help me tell my story.  You were the first and only one who’s had an interest, you’re an amazing person. Thank you dad for everything you have done for me and staying by my side and most of all teaching me that surfing is a gift …we who surf should never forget how lucky we are to have that bond with the ocean, waves and nature.  Also thank you to all my sponsors who have stuck by me through my accident, Matuse Wetsuits, Dakine, NVR strings, FCS, Sharpeye Surfboards, Surfergirl Suncare, and Reef. I would also like to thank some of my friends and especially my family for all the unconditional love. I love you guys…


September 9, 2013 Update: Harley started a concussion support page on Facebook. If you or someone you know has suffered a concussion and need someone to talk to, please visit Harley ROSE.


Photo Credits: Chris Grant, Jeff Taich, Kelly Sinkeldam




Video: Chris Grant / Jettygirl.com | Audio: “Fragments of Melodies for Soprano Sax” by UAUAUA via freesound.org

  • sponsor-message
  • NVR Minimal Coverage Bikinis
  • Matuse Art + Function



Additional Resources:
Follow Harley Taich on Instagram
Harley Taich on Facebook
Harley Taich surfing Santa Cruz, Todos Santos and La Jolla reefs, Winter 2011
NVR Bikinis
Matuse

Traumatic Brain Injury Resources:
CDC’s “Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports – downloadable fact sheets for coaches, athletes, and parents
CDC: Concussion and Mild TBI – information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention




Raen Flyte Sunglasses – CR-39 lenses, metal Raen logo on side, modern silhouette design. Comes with custom case and sock.

More in The Store >>



Disclaimer: Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine is not responsible for, and expressly disclaims all liability for, damages of any kind arising out of use, reference to, or reliance on any information contained within this site. While the information contained within the site is periodically updated, no guarantee is given that the information provided in this website is correct, complete, and up-to-date. You acknowledge and agree that Jettygirl.com is not responsible for, does not have control over, and does not endorse any of the opinions expressed at, on, or through this site. The views and opinions expressed on Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine are solely those of the individual author and may not reflect the opinions of Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine. Although Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine may include links providing direct access to other Internet resources, including websites, Jettygirl is not responsible for the accuracy or content of information contained in these sites. Links from Jettygirl to third-party websites or resources does not constitute an endorsement by Jettygirl, and Jettygirl has not investigated the claims made by any author or advertiser.

* Like, tweet, post, pin, comment or whatever. Waves are meant to be shared.

I'm Laura, a new beginning. Episode One of a quarterly web series featuring Laura Enever.

IM LAURA. A New Beginning. A Web Series Featuring Laura Enever, Pro Surfer.

IM LAURA {a new beginning} from IM LAURA on Vimeo.

IM LAURA {a new beginning}
A Web Series Featuring Laura Enever.

Series Description:
IM LAURA is a new four part web-series documenting the adventures and antics of professional surfer Laura Enever.

After a rollercoaster 2012 on tour Laura decided this year was time for a new chapter. An opportunity for self discovery, doing things a little differently and most importantly, being a 21 year old girl.

Teaming up with Goodcheer, this creative and heart warming production aims to show an honest, stripped back side of professional surfing that is sometimes lost amongst all the glitz and glamour.

Join us for the highs, lows and every quirky moment that goes down during the best year of Laura’s life.

“Their smiles and their love and their everything, it inspires me. They inspire me just as much as I want to inspire them.” -Laura Enever

In the first episode of IM LAURA, the film opens with a glimpse of Laura’s up-and-down 2012. The clip then moves onto a birthday celebration with a local grommet before heading to the first contest of the 2013 season at the Roxy Pro Gold Coast. Episode One closes with tandem surfing smiles and Laura reflecting upon some of the lessons she’s learned from surfing with a local grommet named Pacha.

Film/Edit:
Goodcheer – goodcheer.com.au

Music:
“Silver Line” – Written and Performed by The Orbweavers.
“Swim My Baby” – Written and Performed by The Harpoons.
“Simple Things” – Written and Performed by Hammocks and Honey
“Tee Pee” – Written and Performed by The Murlocs
“Lock It Away” – Written and Performed by The Follies

Screenshots from I'm Laura featuring Laura Enever.

Thumbnail for I'm Laura featuring Laura EneverAdditional Resources:
IM LAURA on Vimeo
Laura Enever on Instagram
Follow Laura Enever on Twitter
Chilli Surfboards
Billabong


Billabong 2mm Peeky Jacket – When the water is warm but a breeze is blowing, Billabong’s 2mm Peeky Jacket is just the thing to keep the chill away. Pair it with your favorite bikini bottoms or boardshorts.

More in The Store >>



* Like, tweet, post, comment or whatever. Waves are meant to be shared.

Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine on Instagram - collage of surfer girls

Follow Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine on Instagram @jettygirlsurfmag

If you’re on Instagram and enjoy checking out surf photos of your favorite female surfers, we’d be honored if you followed ours at http://www.instagram.com/jettygirlsurfmag. In addition, we’ll be featuring a few giveaways through our feed in the next couple of weeks and we’d be stoked if you joined up so we could keep you posted as details unfold.

Surfergirl photo collage including harley taich, sally fitzgibbons, malia ward, erin ashley, margaux arramon-tucoo, anastasia ashley, cori schumacher, alize arnaud, kylie loveland, shea hodges, jenni flanigan, chloe buckley, reika noro, steffi kerson, kyla langen, stephanie schechter, kaley swift, megan godinez, claire bevilacqua, bianca buitendag, lauren sweeney, alexa frantz, kelsey harris, mallory eberlin, courtney conlogue

Instagram

Surfers pictured (in no particular order): Harley Taich, Sally Fitzgibbons, Malia Ward, Erin Ashley, Margaux Arramon-Tucoo, Anastasia Ashley, Cori Schumacher, Alize Arnaud, Kylie Loveland, Shea Hodges, Jenni Flanigan, Chloe Buckley, Reika Noro, Steffi Kerson, Kyla Langen, Stephanie Schechter, Kaley Swift, Megan Godinez, Claire Bevilacqua, Bianca Buitendag, Lauren Sweeney, Alexa Frantz, Kelsey Harris, Mallory Eberlin, and Courtney Conlogue.

HILLOFESCAPE. A Short Film about Anastasia Ashley and Waimea Bay by Daniel Russo.

Anastasia Ashley | HILLOFESCAPE

Description:
A short film about Anastasia Ashley and Waimea Bay. The Hawaiian translation of “Waimea Bay” is “Hill of Escape.” Anastasia Ashley escapes from reality for a brief moment putting fear to the side as she rides down the steep hills of Waimea. Shot on the North Shore of Oahu, Hawaii by Daniel Russo.

HILLOFESCAPE - Anastasia Ashley surfing Waimea Bay. Short surf film by Daniel Russo.

Video:
Daniel Russo

Audio:
“She Was A Vision” – Performed by Active Child – soundcloud.com/active-child



Additional Resources:
Anastasia Ashley
Daniel Russo Photography
Follow Anastasia Ashley on Twitter
Anastasia Ashley on Facebook


HILLOFESCAPE - Anastasia Ashley surfs at Waimea Bay. Short surf film by Daniel Russo.


Rip Curl G-Bomb 1mm Long Sleeve Booty Spring Suit – The Rip Curl G-Bomb spring suit is the ultimate in performance technology. 100% E3 stretch neoprene with external liquid tape makes this wetsuit extremely flexible while achieving unparalleled durability. Cheeky cut bottom. Zipper detail and center front. Flatlock seams. 1mm thickness. Sizes: 6 and 8.

L Space Monique Bitsy Cut Bottom – Solid color cheeky bikini bottom. Ruching at inner front sides and upper middle back. Fully lined. Soft fabric. Low rise bottom with less than moderate seat coverage. Standard fit. Made in the USA. 80% Nylon/20% Elastane. Sizes S, M, L.

More in The Store >>



* Like, tweet, post, comment or whatever. Waves are meant to be shared.

Photo Friday! Surf Photos with Erin Ashley, Bruna Schmitz, Ornella Pellizzari, Dimity Stoyle, Kamalehua Keohokapu, and Courtney Conlogue.

A sampling of surf photos from Jettygirl’s Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram feeds. Have a great weekend everyone :)


Erin Ashley noseride in San Diego County. Surf photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine.

Erin Ashley – Photo: Chris Grant / Jettygirl.com
Low tide hues of green and blue. Erin Ashley.


Bruna Schmitz. Surf photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine.

Bruna Schmitz – Photo: Chris Grant / Jettygirl.com
Do a Google search for Bruna Schmitz and you’ll be wading through well over one hundred images before you get to a single photo of her surfing. This fact may be hidden from the general web searcher but her fins-free blasts are equally beautiful.

Ornella Pellizzari. Surf photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine.

Ornella Pellizzari – Photo: Chris Grant / Jettygirl.com
I’m not sure if they had jack-in-the-box toys in Argentina when she was growing up but my favorite human version is Ornella Pellizzari. By far.

Dimity Stoyle. Frontside air. Surf photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine.

Dimity Stoyle – Photo: Chris Grant / Jettygirl.com
Dear Surf Industry,

You missed one.

The girl on the virtually sticker-less purple board is one of the best surfers I’ve ever seen. If you don’t believe me, believe the legendary Jay Adams who I could hear whistling loudly after the first wave of her session featured a huge hook, a fins-free blast, a clean roundhouse, and a solid frontside air.

Next time you’re calculating budgets and going over pie charts for your lifestyle surfers, perhaps you can carve out a slice for a surfer who actually blows minds instead of kisses.

Sincerely,

A fan of Dimity Stoyle

Kamalehua Keohokapu. Smiles and aloha. Surf photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine.
Kamalehua Keohokapu – Photo: Chris Grant / Jettygirl.com
When surfing is broken down to its simplest form, the common denominator we all share is that it’s fun, pure fun. Facing an onshore closeout, this happy Hawaiian chucked her board up and jumped over the falls with an aloha-filled smile that warmed this particular photographer’s heart. At this 1/1000th of a second in world history, the true meaning of surfing was never clearer. Kamalehua Keohokapu, surfer.


Courtney Conlogue rips one off the top in San Diego County. Surf photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine.

Courtney Conlogue – Photo: Chris Grant / Jettygirl.com
Today I was able to shoot with one of Transworld SURF’s Hottest Girls in Pro Surfing. Had I known of the honor bestowed upon her by making the list, I certainly would have offered my congratulations. Then again, when stacked up against her drive and training for a world title, her amazing painting skills, her deep love of books, her selfless desire to help out with charitable causes, and the absolutely professional way she carries out her duties as an athlete and role model, I don’t think the “hottest girl” thing would rank very high on her list of accomplishments.

Courtney Conlogue, turning heads in a way that any true surfer can appreciate, by laying down a solid turn on a solid wave.

Single Wave Thursday with Courtney Conlogue. One Ride, No Music, Just Surfing.

A couple of weeks back, young California surfer Courtney Conlogue dropped by our local surf spot to put a few of her favorite surfboards through their paces. On this fun little right, punctuated at the beginning and end with the Harbor’s fog horns, Courtney launches and lands a smooth frontside air. Single Wave Thursday. One ride, no music, just surfing.

* To change the resolution to HD, click the little icon to the left of the clock on the YouTube screen (you must hit the play arrow first to see the icons) …HD is the best way to watch Single Wave Thursdays on Jettygirl.


Additional Resources:
Courtney Conlogue on Facebook
Follow Courtney Conlogue on Twitter
Courtney Conlogue’s Instagram
Stamps Surfboards – surf the same boards Courtney rides!
Courtney Conlogue’s surf team profile page on Billabong Girls USA


Try eHealthInsurance
  Single Wave Thursday with Courtney Conlogue. One ride, no music, just surfing. Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine.

Previous Single Wave Thursdays: Erin Ashley | Brittani Nicholl | Alexa Frantz | Lindsay Steinriede

Like, tweet, post or whatever. Waves are meant to be shared.

Calavera Swimwear in Search of New Talents. Win a sponsorship and join the Calavera Surf Team!

Are you holding your own out there in the line-up? Would you like to join the Calavera Surf Team? Get free bikinis that stay on no matter how tough the conditions and financial help to pursue a surfing career? Come along on surf trips to test out new products in the water and get up to no good with the other Calavera girls? Have professional surf videos and photos taken and published in magazines and online? If your answer is YES to the above questions send in your bio and a short surf video / pictures to jointhecalaverasurfers@calaveraswimwear.com.




Calavera Swimwear

Surf Video Clip! Holly Beck Gets a Super Cute Wave in El Salvador.

“If you’ve been on a retreat then you know that waves can be cute. I started describing waves that way during surf lessons as a reaction to ladies looking at a little wave and saying, “it looks scary!” I would respond by saying, “no, it’s a cute one!” Things progressed and now any wave that looks good comes with the tag, “cute”. So, here’s me getting a really cute one in El Salvador. This is how you do it!” -Holly Beck

Video Soundtrack: Nicki Bluhm

Additional Resources:

Suave Dulce Women’s Surf & Yoga Retreat
Holly Beck’s YouTube Channel – Over 3,470,009 views and counting…