Searching for a Schedule in Mexico with Margaux Arramon-tucoo, Jake Zylstra, Anna Ehrgott, Sarica Carlquist, Manny Caro, Christine Brailsford and Hayley Gordon

Searching for a Schedule in Mexico with Margaux Arramon-tucoo, Jake Zylstra, Anna Ehrgott, Sarica Carlquist, Manny Caro, Christine Brailsford & Hayley Gordon

Searching for a Schedule in Mexico with Margaux Arramon-tucoo, Jake Zylstra, Anna Ehrgott, Sarica Carlquist, Manny Caro, Christine Brailsford and Hayley Gordon Words and Photos by Hayley Gordon - leashless.tv Day 1 We have arrived at the airport in Mexico and our ride isn’t there. We eat a random selection of food at the airport restaurant and crack our first Mexican beer, then order a taxi to our destination. Boards stacked high we arrive under cover of darkness, greeted by the rhythmic sound of surf. Cruising down the beach in Mexico. Photo by Hayley Gordon, leashless.tv Searching for a Schedule in Mexico. Surf photo by Hayley Gordon. Day 2 Adjusting to time here is difficult. With no phones and no watches we count time by waves, sessions, naps, tacos, and beers. It takes an adjustment; the mind is constantly searching for a schedule. Things slow down and I find that I can truly relax with a book without checking my phone every 5 minutes. The house is a revolving door as our crew surfs, takes a break for some water and a bite to eat, and heads back out for more. Setting up for a long Mexican left. Surf photo by Hayley Gordon, leashless.tv Mexico noseride. Photo by Hayley Gordon, leashless.tv The long way back. Photo by Hayley Gordon, leashless.tv Day 3 It’s amazing to actually be too hot in the water. As someone who is always cold even in the summer and in places like Puerto Rico and Hawaii, it’s a luxury I don’t get very often. It’s sweltering during the day, and brutal standing on the beach with a camera. Mornings and evenings are the only respite. Thankfully the second day brought a steady breeze. The peeling lefts give us an empty canvas to play on. They are so long that everyone has started to get out of the water and walk up the beach to get back out. Snacks and refreshment. Photo by Hayley Gordon, leashless.tv Day 4 The waves have gradually gotten a bit smaller, but the mechanical lefts keep coming in. We've switched to smaller wave gear, and my shortboards are sitting lonely in the house. Afternoons are reserved for naps, reading, and listening to music on the balcony. Today one of the locals got us coconuts from a nearby field, and they were absolutely delicious. The evening brings a string of intense lightning storms that put on a show all night. Shooting photos and riding lefts in Mexico. Surf photo by Hayley Gordon of leashless.tv Day 5 Unfortunately the surf begins to dwindle, and we turn our sights beyond our home base to explore the nearby coast. Our new friend Josh offers to drive a few miles south towards a beach town filled with luxurious beachfront homes and a beautiful coast with alternating rock-reef and sandbar breaks. We paddle out at a promising looking sandbar, but the surf proves fickle and difficult, and more than a bit sharky. Still the crew managed to get a bunch of waves before a huge baitball appeared in the lineup. Some of us onshore saw dolphins pursuing it, but we also saw a fin that looked a bit more shark-like than dolphin-like, and Jake and Manny paddled in as fast as they could. Checking the surf in Mexico. Photo by Hayley Gordon of leashless.tv Day 6 The surf dwindled even further this day, and so we set our sights on exploring the coast to find yet another break that is notoriously a bit hard to find. We missed the first turn and drove miles in the wrong direction before finding the correct route. The dirt road had been ravaged by recent rains, and it took a while to navigate the pits and bumps. More than a few times our stack of nine surfboards nearly flew from the roof of our Jeep. Once we reached the break we were greeted with an empty lineup and perfectly clean peeling waves. The only problem was the waves were miniature, suitable only for a longboard. The crew did the best they could to wring as much fun from the surf as they could before relaxing under the canopy at the little restaurant on the beach run by a grandma and her family. Although the surf wasn't as stellar as we had hoped, we could see the potential for amazing surf at this spot. Transporting the surfboards for the flight back from Mexico, Hayley Gordon. Day 7 Our last day we were hoping the see the beginnings of a new swell filling in, but the morning greeted us with dribblers crumbling on the point. Unfortunately the swell did not arrive early as we had hoped, so we set about packing our boardbags and getting ready for the journey home. The funniest thing about traveling with a group of surfers is trying to wrangle all the boardbags, and we had more than a few curious onlookers at the airport. We left Mexico with tans, great memories, and a great time together. We didn't quite get the stellar surf we were hoping for, but a week in paradise with your friends is something that will be looked back on with fondness for the rest of our lives. -Hayley *Notes from the jetty... Please check out Hayley Gordon's leashless.tv to view her groundbreaking surf and skate films.
Relaxing until the next surf session in Mexico. Photo by Hayley Gordon, leashless.tv Additional Resources: Leashless.tv - films and images by Hayley Gordon Hayley Gordon @hayley_gordon Margaux Arramon-tucco @margause Jake Zylstra @andjake Anna Ehrgott &annaehrgott Sarica Carlquist @sarica_carlquist Manny Caro @swallowtailsociety Christine Brailsford @whomphandplanes

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“Whomp-O-Rama” encuentro con Christine Brailsford. Entrevista y fotos del evento.

Whomp-O-Rama Encuentro con Christine Brailsford - Fotos de Chris Grant / Jettygirl.com
Aun no me puedo recordar donde o cuando fue que por primera vez escuche acerca de los eventos Whop-O-Rama, pero si tuviera que adivinar probablemente diría que fue a través del "PAIPO debote", Glenn Sakamoto de la revista Liquid Salt Magazine. En los 70' recuerdo que tratamos de utilizar nuestras sandalias como "Handplanes" para correr las olas, fuera de esta experiencia no he tenido la oportunidad de experimentar esta modalidad de "Handplanes". Realmente no tengo idea de que esperar de este evento. En el momento en que llegue a la playa en Leucadia, descubrí un gran grupo de personas amantes de la diversión de todas las edades; compartiendo las olas del mar con sus diferentes y muy originales equipos "rides" para una sección que se me hace difícil renombrar. Hace ya un mes de esta dia y aun puedo escuchar las carcajadas de risa y ver las sonrisas de las personas. Si en algún momento descubres uno de estos eventos ya sea por Facebook o en algún otro de los medios, no lo pienses, ya que es garantizado que te divertirás en grande. Para tener una mejor idea de lo que es Whomp-O-Rama, nos encontramos con su propietario Christine Brailsford ( en la siguiente foto) para conocer su opinión del evento. Christine Brailsford, Whomp Handplanes.  Photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine. Jettygirl: A diferencia de algunas corporaciones que respaldan las demostraciones en la playa (beach demos), los Whomp-O-Rama tienen una forma peculiar, distinta y mucho mas relajada. Durante el evento no se escucho un comentario negativo, ningún mal de ojo, o ambiente hostil en lo absoluto; por el contrario fue muy agradable el poder ver a todas las personas sonriendo, compartiendo las olas y aclamándose los uno a otros. Dígannos un poco mas acerca de este dia. Christine Brailsford: Admito que me encontraba nerviosa unos días previos al evento. Según el reporte del tiempo parecía ser que estaría nublado, sin olas y con vientos en dirección a la costa ( onshore). Con mis dedos cruzados tome la decisión de realizar el evento. En la mañana del evento las condiciones amanecieron perfectas con marea alta, sin viento y un oleaje de 3-5 pies con secciones buenísimas y tubos. Un maravilloso grupo de "whompers" se presento para probar sus tablas, tomar fotos y pasarla bien. Traje algunos "paipos" ( bellyboards) y "handplanes" (tabla de mano) de demostración, para todas las personas presentes. Fue muy agradable ver muchas caras conocidas y nuevas en el agua; surfiando y compartiendo las olas. Durante varias horas nos adueñamos de este punto de la playa- todo el mundo riéndose a carcajadas y apoyándose a gritos los unos otros. Definitivamente fue un dia memorable. Whomp-O-Rama with Christine Brailsford. Whomp Handplanes. Photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl.com. Whomp-O-Rama with Christine Brailsford. Whomp Handplanes. Photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl.com. Whomp-O-Rama with Christine Brailsford. Whomp Handplanes. Photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl.com. Whomp-O-Rama with Christine Brailsford. Whomp Handplanes. Photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl.com. Podemos observar una gran variedad de 'handplanes" con diferentes diseños y formas. Debido a que estos Handplanes son muy pequeños y poseen una reducida área, nos interesa saber si de alguna manera se puede notar la diferencia en los diferentes modelos y formas de estos “handplanes” al correr las olas o si es solo parte de la estética de estos? Usando un handplane puedes coger olas fácilmente y proyectarte en la ola mucho mas rápido. Existen muchas variantes al momento de escoger el “Handplane” apropiado para las diferentes condiciones. El mayor enfoque de mis “Handplanes”, es su flexibilidad. La flexibilidad te permite girar con una mayor naturalidad, como si estuvieras haciendo bodysurfing, sin usar un “handplane”. El diseño de las colas (tails), materiales y forma contribuyen a su flexibilidad. Las diferencias en tamaños trabajan de misma forma que en las tablas de surf. • Las grandes (18″-19″) trabajan bien en olas grandes o en personas de gran tamaño. • Las medianas (14″-15″) trabajan bien en la mayoría de las condiciones y corredores. • Las pequeñas (11″ o menos) son buenas para olas tubulares. También funcionan para los niños. Un Paipo es probablemente el mas veloz artefacto para correr las olas. Es muy parecido a un "Bodyboard" al momento de coger las olas, pero muy distinto en otras cosas. En lugar de flotar sobre la superficie de la ola, estos tienen bordes duros que se entierran en la ola. Esto ayuda a generar velocidad de planeación. Sus bordes actúan como una quilla que te permita controlar los giros en la parte baja de la ola. La parte de abajo de mis Paipos tienen un cóncavo singular y un laminado en la parte superior de la tabla. El tamaño de estos se basa en la estatura, peso y habilidad del corredor. Para las personas que le interese ponerse en contacto con ustedes para ordenar "Handplanes" hechos a mano, cual es el proceso a seguir tomando en cuenta que cada uno de estos es único? Si están interesados en obtener un "Handplane" o un Paipo hecho a la medida o de los que tenemos en inventario nos pueden contactar a través de nuestro correo electrónico at whomphandplanes@gmail.com y para mas información acerca de ordenes, preguntas generales o listas de tiendas locales donde pueden conseguirlos. También pueden echarle un ojo a mis tablas y a mi trabajo, en el portal de la Internet whomphandplanes.tumblr.com. Algún comentario final, o alguna influencia? Quiero agradecer a todos por su apoyo continuo. Estoy muy feliz de poder compartir lo que hago con otras personas. Muchas gracias desde lo mas profundo de mi corazón :). Whomp-O-Rama with Christine Brailsford. Whomp Handplanes. Surf photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine. Whomp-O-Rama with Christine Brailsford. Whomp Handplanes. Surf photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine. Whomp-O-Rama with Christine Brailsford. Whomp Handplanes. Surf photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine. Whomp-O-Rama with Christine Brailsford. Whomp Handplanes. Surf photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine. Whomp-O-Rama with Christine Brailsford. Whomp Handplanes. Surf photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine. Whomp-O-Rama with Christine Brailsford. Whomp Handplanes. Surf photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine. Whomp-O-Rama with Christine Brailsford. Whomp Handplanes. Surf photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine. Whomp-O-Rama with Christine Brailsford. Whomp Handplanes. Surf photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine. Whomp-O-Rama with Christine Brailsford. Whomp Handplanes. Surf photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine. Christine Brailsford, Whomp Handplanes. Surf photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl.com Whomp-O-Rama with Christine Brailsford. Whomp Handplanes. Surf photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine. Whomp-O-Rama with Christine Brailsford. Whomp Handplanes. Surf photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine. Whomp-O-Rama with Christine Brailsford. Whomp Handplanes. Surf photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine.
Additional Resources: Whomp Handplanes - 100% hand-made handplanes, paipos, fins, and surfboards by Christine Brailsford Wegener Surfboards - surfboards and alaias shaped in Encinitas by Jon Wegener Liquid Salt Magazine - celebrating the culture of surfing
* Asi como algun comentario en Twitter. Las olas deben ser "ripeadas."

Whomp-O-Rama Roundup with Christine Brailsford. Interview & Event Photos.

Whomp-O-Rama Roundup with Christine Brailsford - Photos by Chris Grant / Jettygirl.com
I can't recall where or when I first learned of the Whomp-O-Rama event but if I had to guess, it was probably through paipo-devotee, Glenn Sakamoto of Liquid Salt Magazine. I haven't had experience with handplanes other than the rubber flip-flops we used back in the 1970's for the same purpose. I truly didn't know what to expect at the event. Upon arriving at Beacons Beach in Leucadia, I discovered a crew of fun-loving individuals of all ages sharing waves, trying each other's rides, and enjoying a session the likes of which I can't readily recall. It's been about a month since that day and I can still hear the laughter and see the smiles. If you ever see one of these events pop up on Facebook or wherever, take advantage of it. It's a guaranteed fun time! To get the scoop on the Whomp-O-Rama, we met up with Whomp Handplanes owner, Christine Brailsford (pictured below), for her thoughts on the event. Christine Brailsford, Whomp Handplanes.  Photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine. Jettygirl: Unlike many corporate backed beach demo’s, the Whomp-O-Rama had a distinctly relaxed flavor to it. We didn’t hear one bad comment, see any stink-eye, or witness anyone being vibed in any way. To the contrary, it was a pleasant surprise to see everyone smiling, hooting each other into waves, and even sharing rides. Tell us about the day. Christine Brailsford: I'll admit.. I was nervous for a few days before the event. The forecast looked bleak with no swell, scattered rain, and onshore wind. I decided to still hold the event anyway with my fingers crossed. It was a crisp morning and turned out to be perfect conditions. A super high tide, zero wind, and 3-5 foot swell made fun little pockets and barrels. An awesome group of whompers came to try boards, take photos, and hang out. I brought down some paipos (bellyboards) and handplanes for everyone to demo. It was nice to see so many faces, familiar and new, bobbing around, stoked in the surf and sharing waves. For a few hours, our group took over the break---everyone smiling, laughing, and hooting each other on. It was definitely a memorable day. Whomp-O-Rama with Christine Brailsford. Whomp Handplanes. Photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl.com. Whomp-O-Rama with Christine Brailsford. Whomp Handplanes. Photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl.com. Whomp-O-Rama with Christine Brailsford. Whomp Handplanes. Photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl.com. Whomp-O-Rama with Christine Brailsford. Whomp Handplanes. Photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl.com. We saw a variety of shapes and tail designs on handplanes. Due to the small planing surface of a handplane, are the designs purely aesthetic or can you tell a difference between the different tails and outlines when riding a wave? Using a handplane allows you to catch waves easier and plane down the line faster. There are many variables when choosing the right handplane for the right conditions. The main focus with my designs is flex. Flex allows the board to twist for a more natural feeling, like bodysurfing without a handplane. The design of the tails and foil contribute to this flex function. The different size models work similar to different sizes of surfboards: • Larger planes (18"-19") work well in softer surf or for bigger riders. • Medium planes (14"-15") are great all around boards for most conditions and riders. • Small planes (11" and below) are good for hollower waves. They're also great for kids and hobbits. A paipo is probably the fastest wave riding craft. Catching a wave is much like a bodyboard, but very different in other ways. Instead of floating on the surface of the wave, the rail edge is hard and buried in the wave. This creates ultimate planing speed. The tapered rail acts as a "fin", allowing controlled bottom turns. The bottom of my paipos have a single concave and rolled hull nose entry. The size of the paipos are based on the height, weight, and ability of its rider. If someone wanted to get in touch with you to have a handplane shaped, what is the process like since each one is so unique? If you are interested in a custom or stock handplane or paipo, you can contact me via email at whomphandplanes@gmail.com for ordering information, general questions, or for a list of local retailers. You can also check out my boards and work on my photo blog at whomphandplanes.tumblr.com. Any parting thoughts, influences, or shout-outs? I want to thank everyone for their continued support. I'm stoked to be able to share what I do with others. Thank you from the bottom of my heart :). Whomp-O-Rama with Christine Brailsford. Whomp Handplanes. Surf photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine. Whomp-O-Rama with Christine Brailsford. Whomp Handplanes. Surf photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine. Whomp-O-Rama with Christine Brailsford. Whomp Handplanes. Surf photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine. Whomp-O-Rama with Christine Brailsford. Whomp Handplanes. Surf photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine. Whomp-O-Rama with Christine Brailsford. Whomp Handplanes. Surf photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine. Whomp-O-Rama with Christine Brailsford. Whomp Handplanes. Surf photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine. Whomp-O-Rama with Christine Brailsford. Whomp Handplanes. Surf photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine. Whomp-O-Rama with Christine Brailsford. Whomp Handplanes. Surf photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine. Whomp-O-Rama with Christine Brailsford. Whomp Handplanes. Surf photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine. Christine Brailsford, Whomp Handplanes. Surf photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl.com Whomp-O-Rama with Christine Brailsford. Whomp Handplanes. Surf photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine. Whomp-O-Rama with Christine Brailsford. Whomp Handplanes. Surf photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine. Whomp-O-Rama with Christine Brailsford. Whomp Handplanes. Surf photo by Chris Grant, Jettygirl Online Surf Magazine.
Additional Resources: Whomp Handplanes - 100% hand-made handplanes, paipos, fins, and surfboards by Christine Brailsford Wegener Surfboards - surfboards and alaias shaped in Encinitas by Jon Wegener Liquid Salt Magazine - celebrating the culture of surfing
* Like, tweet, post, comment or whatever. Waves are meant to be shared.